Bi-National Workshop – Sharing Agricultural Science, Technology & Data

Workshop_Invitation

 

Aimed at Canadian and American water, soil and agricultural scientists and engineers who want practical solutions to common challenges:

  • How do we measure the effectiveness of agricultural best management practices (BMPs)?
  • How do we scale up data from the site to watersheds to our Great Lakes?
  • What are the tools needed to solve technical problems in the field?
  • Are we all speaking the same language when it comes to data collection and results presentation?
  • What are the social and economic impacts of and challenges to implementing BMPs?

Workshop Sessions

Session 1: Watershed Modelling: Scaling Up from Field to Watershed

Session 2: BMP Implementation and Evaluation: Science, Technology and Socio-Economic Factors – Lesson Learned

Session 3: Moving forward:  Focusing and Communicating BMP Effectiveness

Field Tour of London Area Demonstration Watershed

  • BMPs include terraces, berms (1980 to today), bio reactor for nitrate removal, vegetated filterstrip for barnyard run off
  • Equipment and instrumentation include state of the art soil erosion and water movement monitoring, weather station, direct link of equipment to desk top, autosamplers, loadings, stream flow monitoring

Click here for a downloadable copy of the Bi-national Workshop Final Agenda

Click here for a downloadable copy of the Speaker Biographies

Click here for a downloadable copy of the Sharing Agricultural Science Technology & Data Workshop Proceedings

Presentations     

Session 1: Watershed Modelling:  Scaling up from Field to WatershedThis session speaks about the importance of modeling, and discusses the models available: differences, advantages and disadvantages. Case studies are presented to show the use of best management practices (BMP) modules, programming additions or changes and to explain the data needs are presented. Challenges in calibrating and validating the model, reducing uncertainty, modelling multiple BMPs and their cumulative effect, including climate change factors are also discussed.
Using CANSWAT to Evaluate Water Quantity and Quality Effects of Field BMPs on Gully Creek StreamflowKevin McKague, Water Quality Engineer, OMAF and MRA, Ontario Wanhong Yang, Professor, Department of Geography, University of Guelph, Ontario
A modeling approach to prioritizing BMPs considering spatial and temporal aspectsRamesh Rudra, Professor, Water Resources Engineering, University of Guelph, OntarioDon King, Senior Researcher, Soil Research Group, Ontario
Integrating modeling and spatial technologies to identify critical areas for watershed managementClaire Baffaut, Research Hydrologist, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Missouri
Watershed modeling: improving calibration and understanding model parameterization and uncertaintyRemegio Confesor Jr., Research Scientist, National Center for Water Quality Research (NCWQR), Heidelberg University, Ohio
Evaluation of BMPs from the Field Scale to the WatershedDavid Lobb, Seniro Research Chair, University of Manitoba, Manitoba
Accessing Phosphorus Export in Tile Drainage from Farms with different Tillage Practices  Merrin Macrae, Associate Professor, University of Waterloo, Ontario
Quantifying surface & subsurface phosphorus loss at watershed & field scales: approach, experience, findings Kevin King, Research Agriculture Engineer, United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Ohio
Agri-Water Quality Monitoring, Data Collection and Interpretation at the Plot and Filed Scales in the Past 20 Years: Observations, Lessons & Challenges Tiequan Zhang & Chin Tan, Research Scientists, Greenhouse & Processing Crops Research Center, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Harrow, Ontario
Nutrient Management for Water Quality: are there simple answers in a complex world? Ivan O’Halloran, Professor, University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus, Ontario

 

Friday, June 14

Session 2 (continued):  BMP Implementation and Evaluation: Science, Technology and Socio-Economic Factors – Lesson LearnedA continuation of the previous day’s Session 2 presentations, where the science behind evaluating best management practices (BMP) is discussed in detail. Case studies are presented to describe and compare challenges in the study design, approach, monitoring, data collection and interpretation. Economic and social impacts are also looked at. The effectiveness of BMP programs is reviewed.
Best Management Practices Verification: Results from a Huron County watershed and a Literature Review     Mari Veliz, Healthy Watersheds Supervisor, Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority, OntarioChitra Gowda, Water Quality Specialist, Essex Region Conservation Authority, Ontario
Best Management Practices Verification: Results from a Huron County watershed and a Literature Review     Eric Cooley, Research Coordinator, University of Wisconsin Discovery Farms Program, Wisconsin
BMP Adoption: Owners & Renters     Karthik Nadella, Master of Science candidate, Department of Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics, University of Guelph, OntarioBrady Deaton, Associate Professor, Department of Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics, University of Guelph, Ontario
Do we have enough data to determine if BMPs are effective? A review of data collected to determine if it is enough to assess the effectiveness of BMPs     Elin Betanzo, Senior Policy Analyst, Northeast-Midwest Institute, Washington
Lessons learned from U.S. Agricultural Watershed Conservation Programs     Don Meals, Principal, Ice.Nine Environmental Consulting Burlington, Vermont
Session 3: Moving forward:  Focusing and Communicating BMP EffectivenessThis session looks at how we can move forward, focussing our BMP efforts, knowing what we do now. As well, the need to evolve tools to communicate BMP effectiveness is discussed.
Protecting Lake Erie By Managing Phosphorus: Lake Erie Binational Nutrient Management Strategy     Sandra George, Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative Lead, Environment Canada, OntarioLuca Cargnelli, Great Lakes Program Officer, Environment Canada, Ontario
Mobilizing efforts – increasing efficiency by setting realistic boundaries     Bruce MacDonald, Consultant, Soil Research Group, Ontario
Encouraging BMP implementation on farms and telling the story about what has been done     Margaret May, Regional Program Lead, Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA), Ontario
Watershed Report Cards – An Introduction     Don Pearson, General Manager/Secretary-Treasurer, Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority, Ontario
Evolving field and watershed tools: explaining BMP effectiveness and water quality results     Mari Veliz, Healthy Watersheds Supervisor, Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority, Ontario
Annual Phosphorus Loss Estimator (APLE) – An overview of the USDA tool     Kevin King, Research Agriculture Engineer, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Ohio
NMAN3: A Science-Based Tool for Nutrient Management Planning in Ontario     Dave Bray, Environmental Specialist, OMAF and MRA, Ontario

For more information on this workshop, contact:

Mari Veliz, Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority: mveliz@abca.on.ca or 519-235-2610 ext. 223

Chitra Gowda, Essex Region Conservation Authority: cgowda@erca.org or 519-776-5209 ext. 342.

Teresa Hollingsworth, Upper Thames River Conservation Authority: hollingswortht@thamesriver.on.ca or 519-451-2800 ext. 226.

Gabrielle Ferguson, OMAF and MRA , Ridgetown: gabrielle.ferguson@ontario.ca or 519-674-3472.